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HOW TO MAKE AN EVENT CHECKLIST


SECTION 16 - HIRAM'S HANDBOOK

I. WHAT IS A GOOD EVENT?

A. IT MEETS ITS GOALS.

1. To measure the success of an event (or anything), you must have a goal, stated or implied.

2. To control an event, you must state the goal.

B. A MASTERíS GOALS MAY BE GOOD OR BAD FOR THE LODGE.

1. He may just want to get the year over with.

2. He may want to log a certain number of events with little regard for quality or effect on the lodge.

3. He may want to match a prior Masterís calendar even if it wasnít a success.í

4. He may want to qualify for the Grand Masterís Achievement Award.

5. He may want to entertain members and visitors:

a. Good quality entertainment

b. Widely advertised

c. Varied from previous years

6. He may want to accomplish a certain ceremonial function:

a. Cornerstones

b. Degrees

c. Mortgage burning

d. 50 Year Veteran Awards

7. He may want to interest or educate:

a. Widows Night

b. Mason of the Year Award

c. Past Masters Night

d. Annual roll call

e. Sidelinersí Night

8. He may want to increase attendance:

a. At social events

b. At degrees

II. PLANNING

A. NO SUCCESSFUL EVENT IS ACCIDENTAL.

1. PLANNING is the secret.

2. PRIOR PLANNING PREVENTS POOR PERFORMANCE.

3. Treat all events as special.

4. The ďsuccessĒ is in the details.

B. HOW TO IDENTIFY THE PREPARATION DETAILS OF YOUR PROGRAM?

1. Consult with knowledgeable past masters.

2. Consult with your District Deputy.

3. Read the Lodge Officersí Manual.

4. Seek help from the appropriate Grand Lodge committees.

C. FORM AN EVENT COMMEITEE.

1. Pick a dynamic chairman who is motivated and enthusiastic.

2. He may be a chairman for the year or just for certain events.

3. Work with the chairman to help select his committee.

D. DEFINE COMMITTEES DUTIES.

1. Outline its purposes and responsibilities.

2. Set specific guidelines.

3. Stress the importance and value of their work.

4. Give clear instructions on what you want.

E. SET DEADLINES.

1. Establish completion dates for each task.

F. PUBLICIZE.

1. Give ample notice in your trestleboard.

2. Consider a return reservation card or slip.

3. Use your phone committee.

G. FOLLOW UP.

1. While you, as the Master, are responsible for failure, give your committee the recognition for success.

2. You, as Master, cannot delegate your ultimate responsibility.

3. Follow up each detail and each deadline.

4. Exercise self-control when you delegate:

a. Avoid doing the tasks yourself

b. Check to see if any major problems have been encountered.

c. Praise your committeesí progress, but follow up on unfinished tasks.

d. Identify those who have missed their deadlines, or talk to them privately.

H. CRITIQUE THE EVENT AFTER IT HAS BEEN STAGED.

I. It can be valuable for future events.

2. It can be valuable for future leadersí planning.

3. List what went well.

4. List what went poorly.

5. List what needs improvement or modification.

6. List what needs to be deleted.

7. List what should be added.

REMEMBER TO PLAN YOUR WORK AND WORK YOUR PLAN

III. BASIC ELEMENTS OF STAGING AN EVENT

A. IT SHOULD BE PART OF YOUR BALANCED ANNUAL PLAN.

1. Not haphazardly put together.

2. Programs spaced throughout year.

B. START ON TIME AND END ON TIME.

1. A 5 or 10 minute delay can kill a program.

2. A two hour duration can kill an otherwise good program.

C. YOUR MASTER OF CEREMONIES MUST BE EXPERIENCED.

1. Few masters, believe it or not, are experienced speakers.

2. Everyone speaking, must be HEARD.

3. Check out sound system, before program, early enough to correct problems.

4. Speak into the mike:

a. Never turn your head while speaking unless you have a portable mike.

b. Do not permit others to speak away from the mike.

c. Have a definite program agenda for the MC to follow:

1. No inside jokes

2. No ad libs by inexperienced speakers

3. The MC is the facilitator who keeps things going.

4. The MC must know that he is not the entertainment.

D. AVOID LENGTHY PRELIMINARIES.

1. Make thank yous to support people short and only to groups.

2. Allow only brief announcements.

3. Make the head table introduction concise:

a. Know the protocol

b. Hold the applause.

4. Limit entertainment, before a speaker or other feature, to 20 minutes.

5. If the entertainment IS the program, limit it to 40 minute maximum.

E. INTRODUCTION OF SPEAKER.

1. Pronounce the speakerís name correctly.

2. Announce subject interestingly.

3. Dignify the speakerís credentials.

a. Donít read a lengthy biography: he sent it to you so you could select what would interest your audience.

b. Donít be redundant or overflatter.

F. PHYSICAL SURROUNDINGS.

1. Check the ventilation.

2. Check the lighting:

Avoid any backlight facing the audience.

3. Check the equipment before the program:

a. Slide or movie projectors

b. Tape players, etc.

4. Grand Lodge event:

a. Space the tables far enough apart to permit all to stand without chairs hitting.

b. If Grand Master is to walk in, REMEMBER, WHEN PEOPLE STAND, AISLES DISAPPEAR.

G. CLOSE ON TIME.

1. Donít let the program drag.

2. Donít repeat recognition of workers, etc: Follow up with a letter if you so desire.

3. WHEN THE PROGRAM IS OVER, IT IS OVER: LET IT BE DONE.

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Last modified: March 22, 2014