The Masonic Trowel

... to spread the cement of brotherly love and affection, that cement which unites us into one sacred band or society of brothers, among whom no contention should ever exist, but that noble emulation of who can best work or best agree ...

[What is Freemasonry] [Leadership Development] [Education] [Masonic Talks] [Masonic Magazines Online]
Articles] [Masonic Books Online] [E-Books] [Library Of All Articles] [Masonic Blogs] [Links]
What is New] [Feedback]

 Masonic quotes by Brothers

Search Website For

Add To Favorites

Help Me Maintain OUR Website!!!!!!

List of Contributors

PDF This File

Print This Page

Email This Site To ...

introduction to freemasonry

Over the years hundred of articles and writings has been written that express the essence of freemasonry. The two short ones offered below best describe what Freemasonry is and what it means to a Freemason.

The Ideal Freemason

If you see a man who quietly and modestly moves in the sphere of his life: who, without blemish, fulfils his duty as a man, a subject, a husband and a father; who is pious without blemish or hypocrisy, benevolent without ostentation, and aids his fellowman without self-interest; whose heart beats warm for friendship, whose serene mind is open for licensed pleasures, who in vicissitudes does not despair, nor in fortune will be presumptuous, and who will be resolute in the hour of danger; 

The man who is free from superstition and free from infidelity; who in nature sees the finger of the Eternal Master; who feels and adores the higher destination of man: to whom faith, hope and charity are not mere words without any meaning: to whom property, nay, even life, is not too dear for the protection of innocence and virtue, and for the defense of truth;

The man who towards himself is a severe judge, but who is tolerant with the debilities of his neighbor; who endeavors to oppose errors without arrogance, and to promote intelligence without impatience; who properly understands how to estimate and employ his means; who honors virtue though it may be in the most humble garment, and who does not favor vice though it be clad in purple; and who administers justice to merit whether dwelling in palaces or cottages;

The man who, without courting applause, is loved by all noble-minded men, respected by his superiors and revered by his subordinates;

The man who never proclaims what he has done, can do, or will do, but where need is will lay hold with dispassionate courage, circumspect resolution, indefatigable exertion and a rare power of mind, and who will not cease until he has accomplished his work, and who then, without pretension, will retire into the multitude because he did the good act, not for himself, but for the cause of good! 

If you meet such a man, you will see the personification of brotherly love, relief and truth; and you will have found the ideal of a Freemason.

(Written in 1876 by M.W.Bro. Otto Klotz, honorary Past Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of Canada in the Province of Ontario)

Back to Top


I Am Freemasonry

"I was born in antiquity, in the ancient days when men first dreamed of God. 

I have been tried through the ages, and found true. The crossroads of the world bears the imprint of my feet. And the cathedrals of all nations mark the skill of my hands. I strive for beauty and for symmetry. In my heart are wisdom and strength and courage for those who ask. Upon my altars is the Book of Holy Writ and my prayers are to the OMNIPOTENT GOD. 

My sons work and pray together, without rank or discord, in the public mart, and the inner chamber.  By signs and symbols I teach the lessons of life and death, and relationship of man with God and man with man. My arms are widespread to receive those of lawful age and of good report, who seek me of their own quest for perfection, so much desired and so difficult to attain. I lift up the fallen and shelter the sick, hark to the orphan's cry, the widow's tears, the pain of the old and destitute. I am not church, nor party, nor school, yet my sons bear a full share of responsibility to God, to country, to neighbors and themselves. They are freemen; Tenacious of their liberties and alert to lurking danger. 

At the end I commit them, as each one undertakes the journey beyond the vale into the glory of everlasting life. I ponder the sand within the glass and think: How small is a single life in the eternal Universe.  Always have I taught immortality, and even as I raise men from darkness into light, I am a way of life.


circa 1775: (Author Unknown)

Back to the Top

[What is Freemasonry] [Leadership Development] [Education] [Masonic Talks] [Masonic Magazines Online]
Articles] [Masonic Books Online] [E-Books] [Library Of All Articles] [Masonic Blogs] [Links]
What is New] [Feedback]

This site is not an official site of any recognized Masonic body in the United States or elsewhere.
It is for informational purposes only and does not necessarily reflect the views or opinion
of Freemasonry, nor webmaster nor those of any other regular Masonic body other than those stated.

DEAD LINKS & Reproduction | Legal Disclaimer | Regarding Copyrights

Last modified: March 22, 2014