The Masonic Trowel

... to spread the cement of brotherly love and affection, that cement which unites us into one sacred band or society of brothers, among whom no contention should ever exist, but that noble emulation of who can best work or best agree ...


[What is Freemasonry] [Leadership Development] [Education] [Masonic Talks] [Masonic Magazines Online]
[
Articles] [Masonic Books Online] [E-Books] [Library Of All Articles] [Masonic Blogs] [Links]
 [
What is New] [Feedback]

 Masonic quotes by Brothers



Search Website For


Add To Favorites

Help Me Maintain OUR Website!!!!!!


List of Contributors


PDF This File


Print This Page


Email This Site To ...


Some Tips For The Master

CHAPTER vI

THE WORSHIPFUL MASTER'S HANDBOOK

Grand Lodge, F.A.A.M. of the District of Columbia


Quoting from "Congratulations, Brother," A letter to a newly elected Master by Wayne T. Adams, Junior Grand Warden, in the Winter 1994 Maine Mason.

YOUR OFFICERS - Communicate clearly what you expect of them, the lectures they will be responsible for and the committees they will serve on.

YOUR BRETHREN - Speak individually with each brother who attends a Lodge meeting, let him know that you notice him and appreciate that he is there. Do not overlook the importance of your trestle board. This is the only way you have to communicate with 70% of your members. Take your time with it. Make it informative. Mention names. Give credit. Let the absent brethren know that there is activity, and that they are missing it.

YOUR PAST MASTERS - Make them part of your team. The best way to keep this garrulous old bunch off your back is by giving them a job to do. They can be an asset to you. They are the backbone of your Lodge. They invested their time in it, and they will be more than willing to help you if they see that you are making an effort.

THE HELPERS - Communicate your appreciation to everyone who helps on a Lodge project, from the chief cook to the bottle washer. They are all important. Offer thanks in public. Give credit in your trestle board. Everyone likes to know that his effort is recognized. One of your most important tasks is to offer that recognition on behalf of the whole Lodge.

YOUR ELDER BROTHERS AND WIDOWS - Stay in touch with these people. A fraternity is distinguished from other organizations by its concern for the welfare of its own members and their families. A visit is important. A telephone call is almost as good. A Master communicates not only his personal concern, but the concern of the whole Lodge. If you succeed in this important aspect of fraternal life, you will find that your Lodge will benefit in surprising and unexpected ways.

WIVES - Recognize and chat with each wife who comes to a Lodge event. Today, when both husband and wife commonly work, time together is valuable. It is important for wives to feel that their husbandís Lodge membership is important. Plan fellowship activities and recognition evenings that include wives so that Lodge membership offers them opportunities to participate.

YOUR WIFE - Lastly, but most importantly, communicate with your own wife. Let her know in advance that being Master of your Lodge is important to you and that it will be time consuming. Do not let it come as a surprise. If you explain what you are doing and why, my bet is that she will be a great help and support to you.

Your Lodge will reach out to as many people as you reach out to.

It is a role no one else but the Master can play.

back to top


[What is Freemasonry] [Leadership Development] [Education] [Masonic Talks] [Masonic Magazines Online]
[
Articles] [Masonic Books Online] [E-Books] [Library Of All Articles] [Masonic Blogs] [Links]
 [
What is New] [Feedback]


This site is not an official site of any recognized Masonic body in the United States or elsewhere.
It is for informational purposes only and does not necessarily reflect the views or opinion
of Freemasonry, nor webmaster nor those of any other regular Masonic body other than those stated.

DEAD LINKS & Reproduction | Legal Disclaimer | Regarding Copyrights

Last modified: March 22, 2014